Meeting Recap: Project A11: How Can A Small Family Business Afford to Design and Produce A Proprietary Watch Movement?

Maria & Richard Habring, Founders of  Habring Uhrentechnik OG Völkermarkt, Austria
October 7, 2019

Video recordings of lectures are available to members immediately (using your membership password), and to the general public with a 2 month delay.

Coming all the way from Austria for the October lecture at the Horological Society of New York, Maria and Richard Habring, founders of Habring², gave their perspective on how an independent company like theirs manages to establish a proprietary mechanical movement.

Habring² was able to purchase small orders of movements and spare parts that were graciously provided by ETA. However, when ETA decided to stop selling their product, more specifically spare parts, Habring² was taken by surprise when they asked ETA to explain their public stance on selling spare parts only to ‘brands’. Here is Richard’s brief rendition of the conversation:

H2: Why are you not selling parts to us?
ETA: It’s simple…you’re not a brand.
H2: Okay. What makes for ETA a brand?
ETA: A brand buys at least a hundred movements of one type per year at ETA. Whether it is a mechanical movement or a quartz movement.
H2: Yes, but you don’t sell us mechanical movements.
ETA: Yes, but you can buy quartz movements.
H2: But why should we buy quartz movements?
ETA: That’s not our problem.

So, Habring² had to look for alternatives. Even though Sellita had the parts that Habring² could use, Sellita’s capacity had yet to be established - it would take 18 months and full payment made up front. Naturally, the Sellita arrangement was not going to fly with Habring². It was then that Maria decided that the company would create their own movement.

It needs to be noted that the consequences of ETA’s decision also affected suppliers. For example, one of ETA’s former partners, Ultra, reached out to Habring² to establish a reliable partnership and expand their skills since they no longer supplied winding stems for ETA. Ultra now makes all of Habring²’s rotating parts such as the pinions. The importance of supplier partnerships is extremely important for Habring². There are about 25 suppliers that work with the brand, so much so that the partnerships are described as The Habring² Suppliers Family with the following principles: Sustainability, Reliability, Responsibility, Short distances (between Austria, Switzerland, Germany), Fairness, and “Give and Take”.

Finally, Habring was able to create its first movement: Calibre A11. The movement then evolved into the Calibre A11B which had a total of 99 components. To date, the A11 movement has brought about eight configurations to the Habring² collection:

  • A11B (Base) in the Felix

  • A11S (Second) in the Erwin

  • A11F (Foudroyante) in the Foudroyante Felix

  • A11C (Chrono) in the Chrono-Felix

  • A11COS (Chrono COS) in the COS Felix

  • A11R (Rattrapante) in the Doppel-Felix

  • A11P (Perpetual) in the Perpetual-Doppel

  • A11D90 (Repeater) in the Felix-Repeater

HSNY thanks Maria and Richard Habring for their fascinating lecture!

Photography by Atom Moore
Submitted by Melody Benloss, HSNY Librarian & Recording Secretary

HSNY’s Traveling Education Marches to Washington, D.C. in the Name of Horological Education

The Horological Society of New York (HSNY), America’s oldest watchmaking guild, founded in 1866, is marching to the nation’s capital in the name of horological education. 

On October 12 & 13, 2019, HSNY will visit Washington, D.C. in conjunction with District Time 2019, a two-day watch show which is free and open to the public.

Throughout the weekend, HSNY’s staff of professional watchmakers will teach the Society’s award-winning Horology 101-103 classes, which include lessons in movement mechanics, gear training, winding and setting. Classes will be graciously hosted by McDowell Time and The Time Bum at the District Architecture Center, a spacious, modern venue in the heart of Penn Quarter.  

Tickets are selling fast and can be purchased via HSNY’s Eventbrite page. Sales are directly reinvested into HSNY’s ongoing educational mission to advance the art and science of horology. See you there!

Welcoming New HSNY Members, September 2019

Our global reach is expanding with international memberships!

Our global reach is expanding with international memberships!

HSNY would like to welcome the following new members. It is only with our member's support that we are able to continue flourishing as America's oldest watchmaking guild and advancing the art and science of horology every day. 

  • Ang Cui, NY

  • Aram Gharapetian, NY

  • Donald Saff, MD

  • Georges Weyer, Luxembourg

  • Renaud Selmes, NY

  • Richard Farino, Washington, D.C.

  • Sarosh Mody, India



Upcoming Lecture: Project A11: How Can A Small Family Business Afford to Design and Produce A Proprietary Watch Movement?

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Join HSNY on Monday, October 7, 2019 for a lecture on Project A11: How Can A Small Family Business Afford to Design and Produce A Proprietary Watch Movement? By Maria & Richard Habring, Founders of  Habring Uhrentechnik OG Völkermarkt, Austria. 

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Maria and Richard Habring's approach to manufacturing affordable, high quality mechanical watches in small series contrasts with their former jobs working for large watch companies. At the beginning of their brand, Habring², they relied on outsourced movements and components. But with the Swatch Group / ETA beginning to restrict supply of movements to third parties, Habring² needed to begin manufacturing their own movements. In 2014 on the tenth anniversary of the brand, they presented the Felix, powered by their proprietary A11 movement. At the October 7, 2019, meeting of the Horological Society of New York, Maria and Richard Habring will discuss how Habring² developed the A11 movement, from conception to final design. The Habrings will not only speak about the technical development process, but also the financial aspects of developing a mechanical watch movement.

READ THE FULL STORY HERE!

Meeting Recap: Simon Willard Eight-Day Clocks: In Search of the Finely-Divided Trade, 1785-1825

Robert C. Cheney, Executive Director of the Willard House and Clock Museum
September 10, 2019

Video recordings of lectures are available to members immediately (using your membership password), and the general public with a 2 month delay.

Returning from the summer break, the Horological Society of New York started the September lecture series with an overlooked facet of clockmaking: making a good living and the many trades involved in clock production. Those facets were discussed by Robert C. Cheney, Executive Director of the Willard House and Clock Museum (located in North Grafton, Massachusetts) with a lecture titled “Simon Willard Eight-Day Clocks: In Search of the Finely-Divided Trade, 1785-1825”. 

Known for his painted dials from Birmingham, England, Willard made 1,585 Eight-Day clocks - an incredible amount given that other clockmakers such as the Domini family made about 50 clocks in a 20-year period.

But how was Willard able to do it? Well, there’s clockmaking the traditional way and there’s clockmaking as a successful business, explains Cheney. The traditional way is when the clockmaker makes every part such as the templates, hands, weights, cases, etc., just like George Daniels did with his watchmaking. Willard took advantage of utilizing Peter Stubbs, a merchant who imported parts from Liverpool (the largest city port at the time), wherein Willard put the parts together and stamped his name on the product. Liverpool also had a significant number of clock workshops. Half of the workshops were attached to households which were mostly identified by the tell-tale bank of windows to let in natural light. There were around 17 different trades to make a clock - to name a few - spring maker, wheel cutter, brass founder, and the clocksmith for iron and steel work. As a side note, when it came to pinions, they had to be made out of high quality steel. Sheffield, England had the highest quality steel at the time and it was quite noticeable when low quality American steel was used.

Another interesting aspect is that Cheney made a reference to Adam Smith’s “The Wealth of Nations” on how the story of the clock is like the story of the 18th century common pin. There are 18 operations to make the common pin in which there are distinct different trades.

There were other individuals that Cheney mentioned, such as the likes of John McFarlane, Aaron Willard and the thousands of undocumented journeymen that worked on different aspects of a clock. It was amazing to realize how many people were involved in producing one item such the humble clock.

HSNY thanks Robert Cheney for his fascinating lecture!

Photography by Atom Moore
Submitted by Melody Benloss, HSNY Librarian & Recording Secretary




Hollywood Meets Horology: A Century-Old Society Comes to Life With the Help of Actor Aldis Hodge

Although the Horological Society of New York has been quietly thriving for the last 153 years, it doesn’t hurt to have some hollywood starpower become its voice.

Since 1866, HSNY has been the go-to guild for watchmakers, beginning in New York City and now with an international membership and presence. As HSNY expands, it’s important to let all horology enthusiasts know the many avenues in which they can take advantage of our resources, from monthly lecture series, multiple weekday classes and a rapidly-growing international traveling education program.

The horological community has proven to have strength in numbers, and when passionate individuals come together that’s when HSNY is able to advance the art and science of horology. Aldis Hodge, an actor and horological engineer (not to mention collector), joined HSNY back in 2016 and has been a friend and member since.

I believe the continued education and exploration of horology/horological art is a necessary asset to appreciating our time for what it truly is: one of the greatest sources of wealth we all share on this earth. Understanding the value of how we choose to show and tell time reinforces our appreciation of how we get to spend that time - be it with loved ones, pursuing our greatest passions, exploring new experiences, etc.
— Aldis Hodge

When Hodge isn’t busy filming award-nominated movies and television shows, horology comes to the forefront and becomes the star. HSNY is grateful for Hodge who devoted his time and talent to immortalize HSNY on the screen.

We hope you enjoy our video on America’s oldest watchmaking guild - starring Aldis Hodge, of course - and discover the limitless possibilities that come with joining HSNY!

(L-R) HSNY President Nicholas Manousos, HSNY Executive Director Edwin M. Hydeman and Aldis Hodge attend the      2019 Gala & Charity Auction     .

(L-R) HSNY President Nicholas Manousos, HSNY Executive Director Edwin M. Hydeman and Aldis Hodge attend the 2019 Gala & Charity Auction.

In The (Paris) News: Paris Junior College Watchmaking Students Get High Level Education

Earlier this year, the Horological Society of New York (HSNY) made history by making its first donation to an American horological institution - the watchmaking program at Paris Junior College.

Together with the American Watchmakers-Clockmakers Institute, HSNY pledged $20,000 to Paris Junior College at a critical time when only nine full-time watchmaking schools remain in the US.

Today, the watchmaking program is thriving and paving the way for the next generation of watchmakers. Last week, The Paris News, a newspaper based in Paris, Texas, where the college is located, featured a front-page article on the flourishing courses taught by Paris Junior College Watchmaking Instructor Stanley McMahan. HSNY is proud to help advance the art and science of horology and wishes all students continued success.

Read the full story here!

Welcoming New HSNY Members, July & August 2019

HSNY would like to welcome the following new members. It is only with our member's support that we are able to continue flourishing as America's oldest watchmaking guild, advancing the art and science of horology every day. 

HSNY members mingling after at our last    lecture    with Grand Seiko.

HSNY members mingling after at our last lecture with Grand Seiko.

  • Corey McAuliffe, NY

  • Ekaterina Dubovitskaya, NY

  • Eric Root, FL

  • Evan Embrey, CA

  • Ivan Kosnyrev, NY

  • Jason Baker, NJ

  • Jason Rogart, NJ

  • Jay B. Stambler, NY

  • Kenneth Hull, NY

  • Kevin J. Brown, NJ

  • Leonardo Laviola, NJ

  • Maryhelen Jones, NM

  • Nathan Kim, GA

  • Nicholas DePetrillo, CA

  • Noah Lesser, FL

  • Paul MacLeman, Australia

  • Pervees Faisal Islam, Canada

  • Scott Bluni, NY

  • Sean Lynch, AZ

  • Trudy Maurer, CA

  • Val Schaffner, NY

HSNY Hires First Full-Time Employee

HSNY's growing staff celebrates at the 2019 Gala & Charity Auction. (L-R) Carolina Navarro, Director of Public Relations & Marketing; Ed Hydeman, Executive Director; and Rhonda Critelli, Executive Assistant.

HSNY's growing staff celebrates at the 2019 Gala & Charity Auction. (L-R) Carolina Navarro, Director of Public Relations & Marketing; Ed Hydeman, Executive Director; and Rhonda Critelli, Executive Assistant.

HSNY’s staff is growing: 

Ed Hydeman, HSNY’s Executive Director, is pleased to announce that our staff is growing. In the summer of 2019 he hired HSNY's first full time employee, Carolina Navarro, as Director of Public Relations and Marketing. Carolina comes to us with a degree in journalism and 6 years experience in public relations. She has been an invaluable addition to our wonderful team.

In addition to Carolina, Rhonda Critelli works part time as Ed’s Executive Assistant, Steve Eagle as Director of Education, and Nathan Bobinchak as our resident clockmaker and as an instructor. New additions will be announced soon.

HSNY Traveling Education Returns to Detroit, Orange County & San Francisco

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Rooted in the heart of Manhattan, the Horological Society of New York (HSNY), America’s oldest watchmaking guild, founded in 1866, is branching out with return trips to Detroit, Orange County and San Francisco in the coming months.

If you missed the opportunity to play watchmaker for a day, now is the time to sign up and discover what makes a watch tick with classes taught by professional watchmakers from America’s original horological Society.

HSNY’s Traveling Education will slowly head west with the following schedule:

Each four-hour course offers hands-on experience with the disassembly and reassembly of an ETA 6497 movement, complemented by HSNY’s Horology 101-103 lessons - movement mechanics, gear training, and winding & setting, respectively. Classes are designed for any level of enthusiast as no prior experience is required.

Beginning Saturday, September 14, through Sunday, September 15, HSNY Traveling Education hosts will aid in the Society’s goal of advancing the art and science of horology through teaching. The nonprofit will visit Detroit first, hosted by StockX at Globe Tobacco Building, the oldest surviving tobacco manufactory in Detroit and a National Register of Historic Places site.

Next up, HSNY will head to the Golden State where classes will be hosted on Saturday, September 28 and Sunday, September 29 by A. Lange & Söhne at The Westin South Coast Plaza in Costa Mesa.

Finally, HSNY’s certified instructors will welcome fall in San Francisco alongside fine jewelry & timepieces company, Shreve & Co., in their flagship showroom on Post Street.

Visit HSNY’s Eventbrite page for tickets, class schedules and locations. All sales are directly reinvested into HSNY’s ongoing educational mission.

Upcoming Lecture: Simon Willard Eight-Day Clocks: In Search of the Finely-Divided Trade, 1785-1825

Willard Workshop.jpg

Join HSNY on Tuesday, September 10, 2019 for a lecture on Simon Willard Eight-Day Clocks: In Search of the Finely-Divided Trade, 1785-1825, by Robert C. Cheney, Executive Director of the Willard House and Clock Museum.

As the most complicated trade in 18th century America, clock making relied heavily on a finely divided shop structure to produce domestic timekeepers. Cabinetmakers, carvers, gilders, dial makers, painters and at least seventeen different metal-working trades all joined forces to capture the fervor of nouveau riche Americans to mimic fine English interiors with locally produced furniture, silver, portraiture and clocks to fill elegant new homes. At the September 10, 2019, meeting of the Horological Society of New York, Robert C. Cheney will discuss the fascinating history of Simon Willard eight-day clocks. Previous scholarship by Cheney has documented a little known, but extensive trade in Liverpool and Birmingham goods to supply Willard and others with most of the materials and components needed to fill the needs of an emerging American market. Cheney's HSNY lecture will widen the importance of Liverpool and Birmingham for American clock production and discuss how Willard began to recreate English methodology in Boston by 1800.

READ THE FULL STORY HERE!

In The News: HSNY Trustee William Massena Discusses the Role Clocks Played During Shakespearean Era

In today’s age, we have time management down to a science when it comes to putting on a play. They start on time, intermissions are calculated to the last minute, and acts are rehearsed to fit within time frames. But how was time measured in Shakespeare’s day, and what importance does time play within the works of the man widely regarded as the greatest writer in the English language? HSNY Trustee William Massena sheds light on another William - Shakespeare that is - in this podcast by Cassidy Cash

Time Goes Back In Time: Europa Star Archives Over 90 Years of Horological History

If you've ever wanted to learn about all aspects of horology and its rich history, look no further than Europa Star and the exciting new project they've embarked on. The global watch magazine, which has been delighting industry professionals and enthusiasts alike since 1927, is currently on a mission to archive over 300,000 pages of fully searchable horological material. Ranging from brand profiles to the hottest advertisements of the era, Europa Star is bringing over 90 years of history to the palm of our hand, offering a comprehensive insight into the past with hopes of learning from its failures and successes. 

Click here for more information and to learn how to access the archives! 
Follow
@watch_heritage for Europa Star's daily dose of vintage watches!

Welcoming New HSNY Members, June 2019

HSNY would like to welcome the following new members. It is with your help that we are able to continue flourishing as America's oldest watchmaking guild, and your commitment to HSNY helps us advance the art and science of horology every day.  

 
Becoming a HSNY member has its    benefits   , including receipt of our signature lapel pin!

Becoming a HSNY member has its benefits, including receipt of our signature lapel pin!

 
  • Adam Cook, FL

  • Alexander Hennessy, NY

  • Bill Banks, Canada

  • Bo Meng, CA

  • Bradford Sheridan, TX

  • Brian Quinn, NY

  • Corey Sherman, NY

  • David Olson, NV

  • Greg Kling, CA

  • James Kong, NY

  • Joel Nelson, FL

  • John O'Hearn, MD

  • Joseph Kraeutler, NY

  • Michael Margolis, CT

  • Nathalie Wheldon, CA

  • Nicholas Brawn, Hong Kong

  • Peter C Jachym, NY

  • Phillip Nolan, Australia

  • Sandesh Tuladhar, NY

  • Scott Visin, TX

  • Serge Maillard, Switzerland

  • Thomas John Wilson, NY

  • Victor DiMartino, NJ

  • Zachary Turnbull, NY

  • Zaeem Baig, PA



The Horological Society of New York to Host Classes in London with the British Horological Institute

(NEW YORK) Two of the world’s oldest horological organizations are joining forces to teach horology classes in London on August 31 and September 1, 2019.

With a combined existence of over 300 years, the Horological Society of New York (HSNY) (founded in 1866) and the British Horological Institute (BHI) (founded in 1858) are making history with their first partnership to advance the art and science of horology.

The BHI, who recently celebrated its 161st anniversary on June 15, is welcoming America’s oldest watchmaking guild across the pond to teach HSNY’s coveted Traveling Education courses, which cover lessons in movement mechanics, gear training, and winding and setting. Classes will be hosted at The Clockworks, a unique studio in London centered around electric clocks that combines a museum, workshop, library and meeting space under one roof.

HSNY’s first visit to Europe will be presented by Vincent Robert, Director of Traveling Education, who along with a BHI instructor, will guide an intimate group of students in finding out what makes a mechanical movement tick. Each four-hour course will include the disassembly and reassembly of an ETA 6497 movement for the duration of the course, along with explanations of proper usage of watchmaking tools and of modern horological terminology and theories. No prior experience is required for horology enthusiasts to enroll.

HSNY’s Traveling Education courses in London will be offered (in BST) on Saturday, August 31 (9:00AM – 1:00PM & 2:30PM – 6:30PM) and Sunday, September 1 (9:00AM – 1:00PM & 2:30PM – 6:30PM).

Admission is $500 USD and ticket sales are directly reinvested into HSNY’s ongoing educational mission. The Clockworks is located at 6 Nettlefold Place, West Norwood, London SE27 0JW, UK.

Meeting Recap: Spring Drive: A True Expression of Nature and Time

Joseph Kirk, Brand Curator and National Trainer for Grand Seiko Corporation of America
Monday, June 3, 2019

Video recordings of lectures are available to members immediately (using your membership password), and the general public with a 2 month delay.

“Japan’s history is very old, so time flows slowly for us. I think that’s very important for Japanese people. Looking at the movement of the second hand, it’s like being able to feel the natural slow flow of time, and I think that makes it a very Japanese watch.” - Mr. Yoshifusa Nakazawa

That’s how Joseph Kirk, Brand Curator and National Trainer for Grand Seiko Corporation of America, started the June 3, 2019 lecture of the Horological Society of New York. Kirk believes the quote encapsulates the vision of the Spring Drive as it relates to Japan. In the mid-7th Century, Japanese timekeeping was influenced by nature such as the Rokuku (water clock) and the Wadokei (temporal time clock that measured time by season that was primarily weight driven). Under the leadership of Kintaro Hattori who founded Seikosha (aka Seiko), the following timekeepers reflected the ‘firsts’ of the brand, starting with the mainspring powered clock (1892), the pocket watch (1895), the lever escapement (1899) and the wristwatch (1913).

Before explaining the concept of the Spring Drive, Kirk provided an overview of the mainspring and barrel, gear train, escapement and regulator mechanism to provide contrast to Seiko’s unique movement. In regards to quartz mechanisms, the inverse piezoelectric effect showcased the high accuracy due to its oscillation rate.

Advancements in technology provided Seiko the means to increase the power reserve in the Spring Drive prototypes: First it was 4-hours, then 10-hours due to integrated circuit technology, finally to 48-hours due to new integrated circuit technology.

So, the question regarding the Spring Drive: How does it work? One of the unique aspects of the Spring Drive is the Tri-Synchro Regulator which is composed of the glide wheel, permanent magnet, coils and coil block. The energy usage of the mechanism includes mechanical (generates current), electrical (powers the integrated circuit) and electromagnetic (applies the brakes to the glide wheel). Another aspect is the Silicon on Insulator Integrated Circuit (SOI IC) to prevent power loss. To maintain energy efficiency, the coil is wound 25,000 times around the block, the pinion is polished to reduce friction and the mainspring (which is proprietary) provides high torque. It took from 2006 to 2019 to improve on the Spring Drive movement by producing the Sonnerie, Chronograph GMT, Minute Repeater.

The lecture concluded by Kirk introducing special guests Mr. Akio Naito, Chairman and CEO of Grand Seiko Corporation of America, and Mr. Kazunori Hoshino, Product Planner and Designer of Seiko Epson Corporation. Both men gave their perspectives on ‘the beauty of utility and functionality’ of the Grand Seiko brand in terms of its design and craftsmanship.

HSNY thanks Joseph Kirk for his fascinating lecture, and gratitude towards Mr. Akio Naito and Mr. Kazunori Hoshino for their attendance!

Photography by Ellen Wallop
Submitted by Melody Benloss, HSNY Librarian & Recording Secretary

NAWCC To Host 2019 Ward Francillon Time Symposium in Germany

Time Made in Germany — 700 Years of German Horology
September 12 – 15, 2019

For the 2019 Ward Francillon Time Symposium, the National Association of Watch and Clock Collectors (NAWCC) is joining its German counterpart, the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Chronometrie, in organizing a groundbreaking international conference on the history of German horology. Many of the crucial developments in clock and watchmaking occurred in Germany. Never before have these timekeepers and innovations been examined and described as comprehensively.

For English Speakers

Although the presentations will be delivered in German, English speakers will be provided with written and/or spoken translations. In addition, the texts of the lectures will have been translated in advance and published in hardcover volumes in both languages. 

Registration deadline is August 30.
For more information, visit 
www.timemadeingermany.com.

Madison Avenue Watch Week Set for June 10 - 15, 2019

Madison Avenue Watch Week has become an annual New York City tradition when premier watch retailers offer a “first look” at the timepieces launched at the 29th Salon International de la Haute Horlogerie and the 2019 Baselworld Watch and Jewelry Show. The 9th Annual Madison Avenue Watch Week is scheduled from Monday, June 10 - Saturday, June 15.

Open to the public, this year’s impressive roster of the participating watch brands includes A. Lange & Söhne, Apple, David Yurman, De Beers Jewellers, F.P. Journe, Hublot Boutique, Jaeger-LeCoultre, Montblanc, Panerai, Smythson and Vacheron Constantin. The retailers will offer artisan demonstrations; master classes with watchmakers; presentations regarding trends in design, manufacturing and mechanism technology; exhibitions of new collections, in-store receptions, incentives and giveaways, and exclusive VIP sales appointments.

Visit http://www.madisonavenuewatchweek.com for full details! 

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Welcoming New HSNY Members, May 2019

HSNY would like to welcome the following new members. It is with your help that we are able to continue flourishing as America's oldest watchmaking guild, and your commitment to HSNY helps us advance the art and science of horology every day.  

You’re never too old (or too young!) to become a member. (Photo credit Monica Schipper)

You’re never too old (or too young!) to become a member. (Photo credit Monica Schipper)

  • Christopher Lavagnino, NY

  • Derek Mon, NY

  • Dzianis Karchahin, Canada

  • Gary Barrett, IN

  • Jeffrey Lane, NC

  • Joseph Soufer, CT

  • Joshua Dolin, NY

  • Patrick Hylton, CA

  • Patrick Ryan, NJ

  • Salvatore A Vitale, NY

  • William Sanders, CT