Tradition and Innovation - a Contradiction? By Andreas Strehler
Dec
3
6:00 PM18:00

Tradition and Innovation - a Contradiction? By Andreas Strehler

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Andreas Strehler, Owner of UhrTeil AG

Tradition means doing things the way they have always been done. It also has the connotation of dismissing all things new. Innovation, by contrast, stands for doing things differently from how they have been done in the past, i.e. for breaking with tradition. In his December 3, 2018, lecture at the Horological Society of New York, Andreas Strehler will argue that in watchmaking, true innovation is no contradiction to tradition but only possible based on tradition.

About Andreas Strehler

After watchmaking school in Solothurn, Switzerland, Andreas Strehler started his career at the legendary company Renaud et Papi which is today Audemars Piquet (Renaud et Papi) SA and was then a small start-up. He was the first watchmaker there who was not one of the directors. He became head of the prototype department at a time when his contemporaries were Robert Greubel, Stephen Forsey, Bart and Tim Grönefeld and later Peter Speake-Marin.

Andreas Strehler then went back to his native Winterthur and started working on his own, initially in his father's garage. Today, Andreas Strehler is a Prix Gaïa laureate and a member of the Académie Horlogère des Créateurs Indépendants (AHCI). He has been an independent watchmaker for more than 20 years. His atelier is based in Sirnach, the German speaking part of Switzerland. Andreas Strehler designs, constructs and manufactures his movements in his own workshop with the help of a small and dedicated workforce. He designs, constructs, hand-finishes, assembles and regulates all of the 10 watches personally which are built every year under his name. Andreas also develops and constructs many of the tools and machines he uses. Through UhrTeil SA, his movement production business, he develops, designs and manufactures movements for other brands.

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The Evolution of the Chain-and-Fusee Mechanism in the Quest for Constant Force, by Romain Gauthier
Oct
29
6:00 PM18:00

The Evolution of the Chain-and-Fusee Mechanism in the Quest for Constant Force, by Romain Gauthier

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Romain Gauthier, Founder & CEO of Manufacture Romain Gauthier SA

Video recordings of lecture are available to members immediately (using your membership password), and the general public with a 2 month delay.

When the first spring-driven clocks were invented in the 15th century, they brought with them a conundrum that would become one of horology’s holy grails – providing constant and consistent energy to the movement.

Today, the vast majority of machines run on constant force: cars and planes, for example, don’t start running more slowly as their fuel runs low. A mechanical timepiece works quite differently. The force, or torque, delivered by its mainspring varies as the mainspring unwinds, resulting in fluctuations in the watch’s timing rate over the course of its power reserve.

Watchmakers, clockmakers and engineers alike have proposed various mechanical solutions throughout history for solving the puzzle of achieving constant force from the mainspring.

This lecture will discuss their merits and drawbacks with a special focus on the chain-and-fusee mechanism that dominated watchmaking in the 17th century and which has seen an intriguing return to use in contemporary haute horlogerie, including Romain Gauthier’s very own Logical One.

About Romain Gauthier

Romain Gauthier is the founder, owner and creative driving force behind the high-end Swiss watch brand Romain Gauthier.

A precision mechanic with over 20 years’ experience making complex components for the Swiss watch industry, Gauthier brings an engineer’s approach to his designs for the brand’s in-house movements, coupled with an unstinting devotion to fine hand-finishing that is inspired by the watchmaking heritage of his native Vallée de Joux.

Having built up a manufacture in Le Sentier, Switzerland, Gauthier is able to design and produce his own calibers from scratch. This creative autonomy gives him license to question – and come up with innovative alternatives to – watchmaking conventions, such as the way a watch is wound, the way components like gears, screws and pallet levers are designed, and the way historical mechanisms like the chain-and-fusee perform.

Gauthier’s acclaimed creations include Prestige HM/HMS with caseback crown for efficient winding, Insight Micro-Rotor boasting bidirectional micro-rotor turning between two friction-minimizing ruby bearings, and Logical One featuring a revolutionary constant-force mechanism comprising a ruby-link chain and ‘flat’ snail cam.

The multi-patented Logical One was awarded the prize for Best Men’s Complication watch by the jury of the 2013 Grand Prix d'Horlogerie de Genève, the Oscars of watchmaking.

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Fifty Fathoms: The Conception and Evolution of the Modern Diving Watch, by Jeffrey Kingston
Oct
1
6:00 PM18:00

Fifty Fathoms: The Conception and Evolution of the Modern Diving Watch, by Jeffrey Kingston

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Jeffrey Kingston, Author & Lecturer for Blancpain Watches

Video recordings of lecture are available to members immediately (using your membership password), and the general public with a 2 month delay.

Today, many take diving watches for granted. Perhaps this is because few are actually used for diving. Conference room wear is the modern norm.

But in the aftermath of World War II, things were different. The experience of the war set many of the world’s militaries on the path of developing combat diving corps. At the same time there were a miniscule number of amateur diving clubs that came into being giving birth to the notion of sport diving. Both groups had common cause for much of their equipment. Prominent on the list was a timing instrument to keep track of elapsed time underwater.  

In sharp contrast with other types of watches that followed designs and conventions developed over two centuries, as the decade of the 1950’s began, there was no precedent to follow for the construction of dive watch. The creation of a dive watch would be a white sheet of paper project.

This lecture will follow the inspired story of Jean-Jacques Fiechter, then CEO of Blancpain and a passionate diver, on his development of the Fifty Fathoms and his innovations that made the watch a reality. The history will include the chapters involving the French Navy, the German Navy and the US Navy.

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About Jeffrey Kingston 
Jeff Kingston had a long career practicing anti-trust law, focusing principally upon tech companies. His most notable case took place over more than a decade in Brussels before the Competition Directorate of the European Commission. He was lead counsel in the proceedings brought against Microsoft. Emerging victorious, he was successful in achieving a landmark decision broad in scope and carrying the largest fine in Commission history. Retired from the practice of law, he now devotes himself to writing and speaking about watches. Speaking fluent French, he goes “native” with watchmakers to fortify his knowledge base.

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Mechanical Jewels: The Art of the Watch 1500 – 1800, by Jonathan Snellenburg
Sep
13
6:00 PM18:00

Mechanical Jewels: The Art of the Watch 1500 – 1800, by Jonathan Snellenburg

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Jonathan Snellenburg, Director of Watch and Clock Sales for Bonhams Auctioneers, New York

Video recordings of lecture are available to members immediately (using your membership password), and the general public with a 2 month delay.

Early watches look deceptively like their modern descendants. They are familiar enough to assume the first watches were made to "keep time" as watches do today. Not so. In fact, these early watches were actually indifferent timekeepers, more suited to symbolize time than reliably measure it. Although technical advances over the next 200 years improved their performance, it was not until the end of the 18th century that ordinary watches became truly reliable timekeepers.

The earliest watches were probably carried not so much because civilization required portable timekeepers, but rather because of the Renaissance fashion for pendant jewels that served as both display of wealth and talisman. The early 20th century horologist, G. H. Baillie, referred to this developmental period as the "Age of Decoration." Watches were often fashioned into diverse forms and decorated with scenes from Classical literature. Both the form and decoration of these watches were intended convey a message how to make the best use of time.

Using sources from the fine and decorative arts, this lecture considers the imagery of these early jewel-like watches and illustrates how their appearance reflected society’s evolving attitude toward time and timekeeping. Only when the watch was transformed from metaphor into measuring device in the late 18th century did the “pocket watch” take its familiar modern form.

Jonathan Snellenburg

About Jonathan Snellenburg
Jonathan Snellenburg studied history and geology at Dartmouth College and received a Ph.D. in Geochemistry from the State University of New York at Stony Brook. This led to a post-doctoral fellowship at the American Museum of Natural History, New York, and later, a position as staff gemologist for the Gemological Institute of America. He then joined Christie's, New York, as head of the Jewelry and Silver Departments at their gallery, Christie's East. By the time he left Christie's, as a Senior Vice President and Head of the Watch and Clock Department, he had organized sales in a variety of fields including watches, clocks, jewelry, silver, and scientific instruments.

For many years, he conducted his own business as dealer, consultant and appraiser, as well as serving as a Vice-President of the National Antique & Art Dealers Association of America. He returned to the salesrooms, joining Bonhams New York as Director of Watches and Clocks in 2009. A Freeman of the Worshipful Company of Clockmakers in London, he is also a member of the Antiquarian Horological Society and the NAWCC.

Since 1996 Dr. Snellenburg has appeared as an appraiser in the PBS television series The Antiques Roadshow. He contributed the chapter on 17th and 18th century enamel watches for the Catalogue of European Decorative Arts at the Taft Museum, Cincinnati, and catalogued the Proctor Collection of Watches at the Munson Williams Proctor Art Institute, Utica, New York.

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Fluid Time, by Grégory Dourde
Jun
4
6:00 PM18:00

Fluid Time, by Grégory Dourde

Grégory Dourde, CEO of HYT Watches and Preciflex

June 4, 2018 Grégory Dourde, CEO of HYT Watches and Preciflex

The history of fluidic horology began 3,400 years ago with the clepsydras, or water clocks, of the Pharaohs. These so-called "water thieves" transported water from one container to another to measure elapsed or "stolen" time. This fluidic visualization of the transition of time reappeared in 2012, when HYT Watches introduced a wristwatch incorporating a patented fluidic module and a mechanical watch movement to trigger the fluids propulsion. A colored liquid documents the recent past, a transparent liquid indicates the foreseeable future, and their meniscus (meeting point) is the current time.

Today HYT Watches and Preciflex (its sister company mastering microfluidic technologies) form an ecosystem that unites science, hi-technology, philosophy, art and design. Based in Neuchâtel, Switzerland, a multi-disciplinary team makes liquid time real time. At the June 4, 2018, meeting of the Horological Society of New York, Grégory Dourde, CEO of HYT Watches and Preciflex, will retrace the historical origins of the time measurement with fluids and will explain the numerous scientific challenges and the creative solutions that brought this unique horological project to life.

About Grégory Dourde

Grégory Dourde

Grégory Dourde, an engineering graduate from the Ecole National des Ponts & Chaussees (Paris), obtained an MBA from the College des Ingenieurs in 1997. He has worked for major brands, including Cartier, Calvin Klein and the Swatch Group (under Nicolas Hayek Senior). He then founded his own consulting company, working on performance enhancement and development projects for companies operating in the medical, watchmaking and high-tech sectors. His interest in and passion for fields as diverse as the physical sciences, biology, philosophy, plastic arts and music, reveal a desire to nurture and enrich ideas through an interdisciplinary approach.
 

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The Swiss Watch Industry: 20 Years Into the 21st Century, by William Massena
May
7
6:00 PM18:00

The Swiss Watch Industry: 20 Years Into the 21st Century, by William Massena

William Massena, Managing Director of Timezone.com, Trustee of the Horological Society of New York

Traditional watchmaking has seen astonishing growth in the last 20 years, but at the same time the industry is facing many external and internal challenges. At the May, 2018, meeting of the Horological Society of New York, William Massena will address these challenges and more. In addition, Massena will discuss the role of independent watchmakers alongside large luxury groups in shaping the future of horology, and novelties from specific brands presented at the SIHH in Geneva and BaselWorld which give us clues about where the industry is headed.

William Massena

About William Massena
William Massena is the Managing Director of TimeZone.com, the world’s largest online watch discussion forum, to which he has been a key contributor since its founding in 1995. He is also a partner at Digital Luxury Group, a Geneva-based marketing and communication research company for luxury brands, and a Trustee of the Horological Society of New York. He is a member of the jury of the Grand Prix of Horology of Geneva since 2013.

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2018 Gala & Charity Auction
Apr
18
6:00 PM18:00

2018 Gala & Charity Auction

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The Horological Society of New York invites you to celebrate its 152nd year at the 2018 Gala and Charity Auction on Wednesday April 18, 2018. The annual Gala and Charity Auction is an opportunity to look back at our accomplishments, recognize talented watchmaking students, and bid on incredible watches and ephemera. Join us as we celebrate New York's horological tradition!

Highlights

 


Charity Auction, Hosted by John Reardon, Christie's

Lot 1: Horological Society of New York vintage lapel pin, circa 1930. Only a handful of these original pins still exist. Gold-filled, brand new, never worn. Estimate: $500-$1,000.

Lot 2: Bulova: A History of Firsts, by Aaron Sigmond. Published by Assouline. 176 pages, over 100 illustrations, hardcover in a luxury slipcase. Donated by Bulova. Estimate: $200-$500.

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Lot 3: Steel Rolex, by Giorgia and Guido Mondani. Limited edition of 599, brand new in box, 31 x 41cm, donated by Winthrop Robinson. Estimate: $1,500-$2,000.

Lot 4: An Evening of Patek Philippe with Kelly Yoch, Senior Patek Philippe Consultant for North America at Tiffany & Co. Join Kelly Yoch for an exclusive private tour of the Patek Philippe Salon at Tiffany & Co. followed by a dinner at a Midtown restaurant. You and three friends will be able to ask Kelly everything you ever wanted to know about the world of Tiffany & Co. and Patek Philippe. Date and Time TBD (4 people). Estimate $500-$1000.

Lot 5: An evening of vintage watches with Christie's New York. You and your guests will have a private viewing of Christie's June NYC auction and private sale watches in advance of public opening the next day. After the viewing, you and up to three friends will be treated to a dinner with John Reardon and Rebecca Ross at an exclusive Midtown restaurant. June 7, 6:30-7:30 viewing, Dinner 7:45 (4 people). Estimate $500-$1,000.

Lot 6: Chronos and Quantième Perpétuel, artwork by Xavier Magaldi. Swiss made in 2013, two color silkscreen on 300 gram paper, 35 x 35 cm. Signed and donated by the artist. Estimate: $500 - $1,000.

Lot 7: The Watchmaker’s Apprentice DVD, signed and donated by Roger W. Smith. Estimate: $100-$300.

Lot 8: George Daniels’ personal copy of The Practical Watch Escapement, with his correction notes, signed and donated by Roger W. Smith. Estimate: $1,000-$2,000.

Lot 9: Set of 2 watches: Limited Edition Bulova x Analog/Shift Devil Diver with canvas strap and bracelet & vintage Bulova Devil Diver, donated by Analog/Shift. The modern watch is brand new, never worn and completely sold-out. 1 year warranty included for both watches. Estimate: $4,000-$6,000.

Lot 10: Zenith El Primero Original Limited Edition For HODINKEE, donated by HODINKEE. Highly coveted, completely sold-out. Estimate: $8,000-$10,000.

HSNY's 2018 Charity Auction, hosted by Christie's, will take place at the Gala. A selection of extraordinary timepieces and horological miscellanea will be up for sale, with all proceeds benefitting HSNY's ongoing educational programs. There will be no buyer's premiums, and all bidding will take place live in the room. 

Preview to take place Tuesday, April 17, 2018, 3-6pm, at the Horological Society of New York office and classroom at 20 West 44th St., Room 506, New York, NY.


Presentation of the Henry B. Fried Scholarship

Henry B. Fried instructing students on escapement mechanics. Photo courtesy of the Brooklyn Public Library—Brooklyn Collection.

Most watchmaking schools in the USA are free. Tuition is covered by a sponsoring brand, and usually the only school expense that the students cover are their tools. These schools are full-time two year programs, meaning paying for living expenses can be difficult. This is where the Henry B. Fried Scholarship comes in; the Horological Society of New York wants to help American watchmaking students succeed in every way. The winners of the 2018 Henry B. Fried Scholarship will be announced at the 2018 Gala.

 


Speakers


Food, Drink & Music

Enjoy a large selection of food and drink, with an open bar from 6:00pm - 9:00pm. Live music throughout the evening. The suggested attire is business formal.


 Chef Robby J Bither, Carving Board Catering

Chef Robby J Bither, Carving Board Catering

  • Mini Tacos - Mole poblano chicken & rainbow Swiss chard
  • Fondue - French Savoyarde & chocolate raspberry
  • Swedish Meatballs with lingonberry and gravy drizzle
  • Mini Bratwurst with German mustard
  • Sliders - Pulled pork in fig BBQ, southern style crispy chicken with remoulade & chipotle mushroom with muenster cheese
  • Indian dosa with potatoes
  • Pad Thai - Chicken & vegetarian
  • Drinks - Beer, red & white wine, sodas
  • Cocktails - Sake lychee martini, red sangria & Pimm's punch

We look forward to seeing you there!

All proceeds from this event go towards the Horological Society of New York's ongoing educational programs. The Horological Society of New York is a registered 501(c)(3) non-profit organization, federal tax identification number 13-6139887.



HSNY thanks our sponsors for their generous support.

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Horological Conservation: A Preliminary Study of Bellows Materials in Smoking Automata, by Brittany Nicole Cox
Mar
5
6:00 PM18:00

Horological Conservation: A Preliminary Study of Bellows Materials in Smoking Automata, by Brittany Nicole Cox

Brittany Nicole Cox, Antiquarian Horologist, Seattle, Washington

At the March 5, 2018, meeting of the Horological Society of New York, Brittany Nicole Cox will present her research and findings into the conservation of bellows materials inside dynamic objects, specifically mechanical smoking automata made in France between the period of 1848 and 1914. These findings required the construction of a machine capable of running three sets of bellows simultaneously. The materials tested and the results of using these materials will be discussed. Conclusions drawn from this research demonstrate how problems arise when tangible and intangible qualities are in direct conflict, and why these problems are difficult to address in the case of dynamic objects, especially automata.

Brittany Nicole Cox

About Brittany Nicole Cox
Brittany Nicole Cox is an antiquarian horologist based in Seattle, Washington. Her lifelong passion for horology has seen her through nine years in higher education where she earned her WOSTEP, CW21, and SAWTA watchmaking certifications, two clockmaking certifications, and a Masters in the Conservation of Clocks and Related Dynamic Objects from West Dean College, UK. In 2015 she opened Memoria Technica, an independent workshop where she teaches, practices guilloché and ornamental turning, and specializes in the conservation of automata, mechanical magic, mechanical music, and complicated clocks and watches. Currently, she is working on a manuscript to be published by Penguin Press in 2018. 

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The Essentials Of Precision Timekeeping, by Jack Forster
Feb
5
6:00 PM18:00

The Essentials Of Precision Timekeeping, by Jack Forster

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Jack Forster, Editor-in-Chief, HODINKEE

Everyone wants their watch to be accurate, and moreover, nowadays everyone expects it. But just how hard is it to make an accurate watch, and what makes a watch accurate in the first place? In this lecture, we’ll look at how and why precision timekeeping evolved, from the earliest water clocks, through the evolution of pendulum clocks, the first watches, marine chronometers, and on down to today’s precision wristwatch. On the way, we’ll keep in mind – as we explore how the modern watch has been shaped by nearly a thousand years of technological and scientific exploration – certain fundamentals in mechanics and physics, and how the ancient enemies of accuracy are still fought on a daily basis by watchmakers today. And we’ll also look at how and why it is that accuracy isn’t just interesting intellectually – we’ll explore how it has a romance all its own.

Jack Forster

About Jack Forster
Jack Forster is Editor-in-Chief of HODINKEE. He first became interested in watches as a student in graduate school, and spent many years collecting and repairing vintage pocket watches as a hobby. His first exposure to online watch discussion was on Usenet newsgroups, in the mid-1990s; and he has also been a moderator on the well-known collector's forum, PuristSPro.com. From 2006 to 2015 he was a part of Revolution Press Ltd, first as Group Technical Editor, and then as Editor in Chief for the US edition of Revolution Magazine. He has also worked on a number of freelance special projects over the years and in a marketing/PR consulting capacity, for clients both within and outside the watch industry. He is the author of Cartier: Time Art, a catalogue for the exhibition of the same name, which chronicles the history of watch and clockmaking at Cartier from its inception to the present day. His other interests include pretty much anything interesting.

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An Introduction to the Naked Watchmaker Platform, by Peter Speake-Marin
Jan
9
6:00 PM18:00

An Introduction to the Naked Watchmaker Platform, by Peter Speake-Marin

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Peter Speake-Marin, Founder, The Naked Watchmaker, Switzerland

At the January 9, 2018, meeting of the Horological Society of New York, British watchmaker Peter Speake-Marin will present his new platform for watchmaking education, The Naked Watchmaker. The platform stems from Speake-Marin’s time as an antiquarian horologist in London working on antique pocket watches and vintage wristwatches. In his lecture, Speake-Marin will address the technical points needed to understand modern brands, the finer aspects of independent watchmakers and the key points to consider when looking at calibre manufacturers. Speake-Marin will also touch on future goals for The Naked Watchmaker, including his interview series and fascinating macro photography.

About Peter Speake-Marin
Peter Speake-Marin, born in 1968 in Essex, England, left school at 17 and discovered horology. Speake-Marin’s watchmaking career has touched on every segment of the watchmaking industry, from the antique world of restoration to modern complications, from being a consultant, to developing brands. His final dream of sharing his love of watchmaking (modern and vintage, simple to complex) was never realized, until today with the launch of The Naked Watchmaker platform.

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The Development of a Practical Watch Escapement, by Roger W. Smith
Dec
4
6:00 PM18:00

The Development of a Practical Watch Escapement, by Roger W. Smith

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Roger W. Smith, Founder, Roger W. Smith Ltd., Isle of Man, British Isles

If you hold a mechanical watch to your ear you can hear the escapement doing its job, ticking many times per second and keeping you on time. The escapement is one of the most important inventions in history, yet we don't know exactly who invented it and when. Instead, the development of the escapement was contributed to over centuries by watch and clock makers around the world. This work has advanced the escapement to a level that is refined, accurate, and practical. Understanding the history of the escapement leads to a deeper understanding of timekeepers in general, and a greater appreciation of the escapement development that continues today.

At the December 2017 meeting of the Horological Society of New York, Roger W. Smith will present an in-depth look at the development of a practical watch escapement. This lecture is a unique opportunity to hear from one of the world's leading watchmakers on a topic that he is extraordinarily qualified to speak on. Smith's continued development of the Daniels co-axial escapement is pushing the practical watch escapement to new levels of efficiency and reliability. Smith's lecture will serve as a continuation of George Daniels' famous lecture on escapements, which inspired him to begin his career in watchmaking. The American Watchmaker-Clockmakers Institute (AWCI) recently digitized and published a video of Daniels giving this lecture at an AWCI National Convention in 1990, which Smith recommends that all attendees watch prior to his upcoming lecture.

Roger W. Smith standing in front of George Daniels' watchmaking bench.

A Unique Horological Education Class With Roger W. Smith
Brooklyn, New York - Sunday, December 3, 2017
Smith is passionate about horological education, as demonstrated by his extensive video series on YouTube. The Sunday before December's HSNY meeting, Smith will guest instruct a very special horological education class in Brooklyn. With only 6 tickets available, this unique class will serve as a fundraising event for HSNY. This is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to learn from one of the most accomplished watchmakers in the world, and help raise money for a good cause. (HSNY is a registered 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization.) Tickets for Sunday's class are available now.

Roger W. Smith

About Roger W. Smith
Roger W. Smith’s horological career began when he enrolled at the Manchester School of Horology, aged 16. Smith graduated at the top of his class, and won the British Horological Institute’s Bronze medal. During the course, Dr. George Daniels (1926 - 2011), was a visiting speaker and inspired the first steps of Smith's now famous journey - to make a watch according to the Daniels Method. After working alongside his mentor in the creation of the Millennium Series of watches, Smith established his own studio on the Isle of Man in 2001 and debuted his Series 1 watch. Five years later in 2006, Smith introduced his seminal Series 2 watch. In 2013 Roger was invited by the UK Prime Minister’s office to become an Ambassador for the GREAT Britain campaign, creating the now iconic GREAT Britain watch. In 2015, Roger Smith announced the first range of authentic British watches in decades, comprising the reimagined Series 1 and 2 alongside newly developed Series 3 and 4 watches, all featuring the latest evolution of the Smith single-wheel co-axial escapement.
 

 

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How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Radium Dials, by Kathleen McGivney
Nov
7
6:00 PM18:00

How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Radium Dials, by Kathleen McGivney

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Kathleen McGivney, COO, RedBar Group and Director of Operations, Horological Society of New York

Radioluminescence, the process by which light is produced by bombarding a reactive material with ionizing radiation, was widely used as the demand for watches that were readable at night grew. At the November 2017 meeting of the Horological Society of New York, Kathleen McGivney will discuss the history of luminescence in watches and instrument dials. In her talk, McGivney will visit the beginning of the use of radioactive material in watch and instrument dials, the reason for the use of radium as the specific material to achieve that goal, the context of the prevailing wisdom of the day of the safety of radium, and how and why watch manufacturers moved on to other materials to achieve luminescence. McGivney will also discuss the implications of radium dials that still retain some radioactivity to collectors and watchmakers who handle them.

 Kathleen McGivney

Kathleen McGivney

About Kathleen McGivney
Kathleen McGivney is a watch collector and consultant based in New York City. She is passionate about watch collecting and fostering the rapidly growing community of horology enthusiasts worldwide. She manages operations, events, and charitable giving for RedBar Group and is also the Director of Operations for the Horological Society of New York.

Photography by Atom Moore

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Fakes, Forgeries and the Birth of Mass Production in the European Watch Industry, 1750-1820, by Dr. Rebecca Struthers
Oct
2
6:00 PM18:00

Fakes, Forgeries and the Birth of Mass Production in the European Watch Industry, 1750-1820, by Dr. Rebecca Struthers

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Dr. Rebecca Struthers FBHI FRSA Ph.D., Birmingham, UK

Historically, the term "Dutch forgery" has referred to watches manufactured in the latter part of the eighteenth century, purporting to have been made in London and yet created with Dutch physical characteristics. It has long been believed that these watches were not made in London, hence the application of "forgery", with the general assumption amongst antiquarian horologists being that Geneva was their true city of origin. At the October meeting of the Horological Society of New York, Rebecca Struthers will lecture on her thesis research concerning the aforementioned watches.

These "Dutch forgery" watches were not of a high quality, made no scientific contribution to our understanding of time and accuracy and as such, they have largely been condemned to the dark corners of horological research. They have been dismissed as fakes and forgeries regarded as holding little relevance to the course of horological history, and yet, as this study innovatively claims, they represent the birth of mass production in the watch industry. Over the course of the timeframe covered (1750-1820), they play an integral role in the commercialisation of the watch which shifted from an immensely valuable object of desire to a more attainable accessory. They started the journey towards making portable timekeepers accessible to all in the developed world, and yet their remarkable story has never been the subject of a detailed published study.

At its heart, this research contains the most thorough physical examination of surviving examples of these watches conducted to date. Carried out by Struthers, these examinations benefit from the unique insight of a practicing watchmaker in the twenty-first century, studying and interpreting the work of their predecessors. This evidence helps to distinguish these watches from others made during the same period, and, along with documentary evidence, leads to a new understanding of where they were made and also their dissemination and their destination markets.

Rebecca Struthers

About Rebecca Struthers
Rebecca Struthers (Ph.D., Birmingham City University, UK) is a watchmaker and researcher of antiquarian horology focusing on the role of the watch in eighteenth-century material culture and the evolving social interpretation of luxury. Around her research, Struthers, together with her husband Craig, co-founded their own design studio and horological workshops in 2012: Struthers London. The pair specialize in the design and creation of watches using heritage manufacturing techniques.

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Choosing a Clock: Regulation, Cosmopolitanism and Humbuggery, by Professor Kevin Birth
Sep
5
6:00 PM18:00

Choosing a Clock: Regulation, Cosmopolitanism and Humbuggery, by Professor Kevin Birth

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Professor Kevin Birth, Department of Anthropology, Queens College, City University of New York

In the history of timekeeping, there have been periods during which multiple ways of reckoning time have existed. At the September 2017 meeting of the Horological Society of New York, Professor Kevin Birth will discuss several cases concerning political uses of horology in contexts of time pluralism. Cases to be discussed include late medieval York, Habsburg diplomacy, Fernando Wood’s hijacking of the 1859 New York Democratic Party Convention, the enforcement of liquor laws in 19th century England, and todays issues surrounding the leap second. Each case will explore different ways in which horology and politics become intertwined, and will explore how our current horological practices are very much an outcome of political and cultural compromises.

17th century Nuremberg Ivory Diptych sundial showing latitudes for different cities, Italian hours, Babylonian hours, and the number of hours of daylight and darkness (inventory no. 7899, The Collection of Historical Scientific Instruments, Harvard University).

Ottoman Pillar Dial showing equinoctial hours and time alla Turca (inventory no. 7184, The Collection of Historical Scientific Instruments, Harvard University)

 Kevin Birth

Kevin Birth

About Kevin Birth
Kevin Birth (Ph.D., University of California at San Diego) is a professor of anthropology at Queens College of the City University of New York. He studies cultural concepts of time in relationship to cognition and politics. His publications and presentations cover a wide ranging array of topics including chronobiology and globalization, comparative calendars, timekeeping in Roman Britain, culture and memory, cognitive neuroscience, early modern clocks, ideas about roosters in the Middle Ages, and current time practices and policies. He is the author of four books: Any Time is Trinidad Time (University Press of Florida),  Bacchanalian Sentiments (Duke University Press), Objects of Time (Palgrave Macmillan), and Time Blind: Problems in Perceiving Other Temporalities (Palgrave Macmillan).  

Title photograph: Augsburg table clock, 17th century. Metropolitan Museum of Art.

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The History of the Tourbillon, by Stephen Forsey
Jun
5
6:00 PM18:00

The History of the Tourbillon, by Stephen Forsey

Stephen Forsey, co-founder of Greubel Forsey and CompliTime SA

Watchmakers have always sought to improve the precision of mechanical timekeepers, and the tourbillon has been a significant invention in this adventure. At the June 2017 meeting of the Horological Society of New York, Stephen Forsey will retrace the historical origins of the tourbillon from the pocket watch to the wristwatch. In addition, a selection of Greubel Forsey timepieces will be on display.

Robert Greubel & Stephen Forsey

Robert Greubel & Stephen Forsey began working together in 1999 on a new generation of tourbillons for the wristwatch, culminating with the launch in 2004 of their Double Tourbillon 30°. Today, Greubel Forsey continues to innovate with a wide range of complicated timepieces, including their newly announced Grande Sonnerie.

Stephen Forsey

About Stephen Forsey
Stephen Forsey was born in St. Albans, England, where he inherited his father’s passion for the intricacies of mechanics. From 1987 he specialized in antique watch restoration, and he subsequently became the head of Asprey of London’s prestigious watch restoration department; he then furthered his horological education at WOSTEP (Watchmakers of Switzerland Training and Educational Program). After moving to Switzerland in 1992, Stephen met Robert Greubel and started working on the most complicated mechanical movements. In 1999, he left to work independently and in 2001 he co-founded CompliTime with Robert Greubel. Together, they then launched Greubel Forsey in 2004.

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Glashütte on Board – 130 Years of Marine Chronometers From Saxony, by Ulrike Kranz
May
1
6:00 PM18:00

Glashütte on Board – 130 Years of Marine Chronometers From Saxony, by Ulrike Kranz

Ulrike Kranz - Glashütte Original

For its May meeting, the Horological Society of New York welcomes a special guest from Germany, Ulrike Kranz. Kranz will lecture on the history of the German Marine Chronometer, a topic she is very familiar with after her time working at the German Watch Museum and position today at Glashütte Original. In addition to the evening lecture, a selection of historic timepieces from the German Watch Museum will be on display.

With the founding of the German Empire in 1871 and growing interest in international trade, the German Navy became more and more important to the German government. To reduce reliance on English imports (including the well-known English marine chronometers), significant support was provided to encourage the production of marine chronometers in Germany. In 1886 the first marine chronometers from Glashütte were sent to the German Naval Observatory in Hamburg for testing. In the following years, numerous innovations and technical improvements brought international attention to marine chronometers manufactured in Glashütte.

After World War II Germany was divided, but the production of chronometers in Glashütte continued. The state-owned company VEB Glashütter Uhrenbetriebe took up the tradition and manufactured a large number of both mechanical and quartz marine chronometers. These were deployed primarily on GDR ships but also exported worldwide.
 
Although today navigation at sea is performed around the world using GPS, Glashütte in Saxony remains a significant location for the production of marine chronometers and observation watches. Following the reunification of Germany, the Glashütte astronomical observatory was restored. Today it houses a chronometer testing facility, which also officially certifies the chronometers made by Glashütte Original – the legal successor of the VEB Glashütter Uhrenbetriebe.

 Ulrike Kranz

Ulrike Kranz

About Ulrike Kranz
Ulrike Kranz is the head of Corporate Communications for Glashütte Original. Previously, Kranz worked at the German Watch Museum in Glashütte. She holds a MSc in Ethics & Corporate Governance from the University of London and a B.A. from the University of Greenwich.

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2017 Gala & Charity Auction
Apr
3
6:00 PM18:00

2017 Gala & Charity Auction

As the Horological Society of New York embarks on its 151st year, join us as we reestablish an important tradition - the Annual Gala. Beginning in 1933, HSNY's Annual Gala's were lavish affairs, attended by members and guests representing all parts of the watch and clock making industry in New York City. Carrying on the success of 2016's 150th Anniversary Gala, the 2017 Gala & Charity Auction will be held on April 3.

Highlights

 

Charity Auction

Over 40 years ago, a collection of timepieces was bequeathed to the Horological Society of New York, consigned to a vault, and forgotten. The current Board of Directors has re-discovered these treasures, and through deliberation decided to use them to commence with a new Charity Auction tradition to begin and support the HSNY Endowment Fund.

HSNY's 2017 Charity Auction will take place at the Gala, and is made possible by Heritage Auctions. There will be no buyer's premiums for the lots. Online bidding will open on March 20 and will be closed the day of the Gala. All final bidding will take place live in the room during the Gala. HSNY's Endowment Fund is being established with the goal to ensure long-term success for the Society.

 

Presentation of the Henry B. Fried Scholarship

Most watchmaking schools in the USA are free. Tuition is covered by a sponsoring brand, and usually the only school expense that the students cover are their tools. These schools are full-time two year programs, meaning paying for living expenses can be difficult. This is where the Henry B. Fried Scholarship comes in; the Horological Society of New York wants to help American watchmaking students succeed in every way. The winner of the 2017 Henry B. Fried Scholarship will be announced at the 2017 Gala.

 

Dinner & Drinks

Enjoy a large selection of appetizers, entrees and desserts, with an open bar from 6:00pm - 9:00pm. The suggested attire is business formal. Discounted tickets are available to HSNY members, using your membership password as a promotional code at the ticket checkout.

We look forward to seeing you there!

All proceeds from this event go towards the Horological Society of New York's ongoing educational programs, and the Horological Society of New York's Endowment Fund. The Horological Society of New York is a registered 501(c)(3) non-profit organization, federal tax identification number 13-6139887.


HSNY thanks our sponsors for their generous support

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How to Win (and Sometimes Lose) at Watch Auctions, by William Massena
Mar
6
6:00 PM18:00

How to Win (and Sometimes Lose) at Watch Auctions, by William Massena

William Massena - Managing Director of TimeZone.com

Watch auctions can be intimidating even for the most experienced collectors. What questions should you ask a specialist? How do you bid successfully? What pitfalls should you avoid? At the March 2017 meeting of the Horological Society of New York, William Massena will address these questions and more. Massena's illustrated lecture will explore all aspects of the world of watch auctions, including key auction houses in the international watch market, the role of auctions in the context of watch collecting, and nuances of catalogue descriptions.

 William Massena

William Massena

About William Massena
William Massena is the Managing Director of TimeZone.com, the world’s largest online watch discussion forum, to which he has been a key contributor since its founding in 1995. He is also a partner at Digital Luxury Group, a Geneva-based marketing and communication research company for luxury brands, and a Trustee of the Horological Society of New York. Previously, he was the Chief Operating Officer and Managing Director of Antiquorum S.A., the leading horological auction house and a consultant for Bonhams Auctioneers.

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Time is Money - How to Make a Living in the World of Watches, by John Rearon
Feb
6
6:00 PM18:00

Time is Money - How to Make a Living in the World of Watches, by John Rearon

  • HSNY at the General Society Library (map)
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John Reardon - International Head of Watches, Christie's

The watch industry employs hundreds of thousands of people in over 100 countries around the world. A career in the world of watches is a dream come true and many individuals have found their professional path in unique and unexpected ways. At HSNY's February 6 meeting, Reardon will explore how people make a living within the world of watches and horology, including stories of how they broke into the business and their day to day lives in the "game of the time." The scope of Reardon's lecture will include stories from the auction industry, museum world, retailers, vintage watch dealers, watchmakers, marketers, designer, photographers, bloggers, social influencers, and more, all underlining how people make a living doing what they love.
 
For people looking to break into the watch world professionally or simply looking to use their horological knowledge to generate income, Reardon will share stories of numerous industry insiders and the many paths people take be part of this fascinating worldwide community.

 John Reardon

John Reardon

About John Reardon 
John Reardon first became interested in clocks and watches while interning at the American Watch and Clock Museum in his hometown of Bristol, Connecticut where he learned clock repair and restoration. While completing a degree in history and languages, he worked as a curatorial assistant at the Willard House and Clock Museum in Grafton, Massachusetts. His passion for all things horological brought him to the auction world in New York in the 1990s where his academic and commercial focus turned to watches. In 2001, he joined Patek Philippe USA and become a noted author, writer and researcher in all things related to the famous Swiss manufacture. After a decade with Patek Philippe, he rejoined the auction world and is presently the International Head of Watches at Christie’s. He is a contributing writer for the Life and Times feature in the Patek Philippe Magazine and has written three books on the history of watches, most notably Patek Philippe in America: Marketing the World’s Foremost Watch.

Pictured above: Auctioneer Thomas Perazzi, courtesy of Christie's

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Horology in Art, by Bob Frishman
Jan
10
6:00 PM18:00

Horology in Art, by Bob Frishman

  • HSNY at the General Society Library (map)
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Bob Frishman - Founder and Owner of Bell-Time Clocks

Jacques-Louis David, The Emperor Napoleon in His Study at the Tuileries, 1812

For more than 2,000 years, timekeepers have appeared in art. An ancient Roman mosaic depicting “Plato’s Academy” shows a pedestal-mounted sundial, a 1285 manuscript illuminates a water clock, several 16th century Renaissance portraits by Titian feature small gilt mechanical table clocks, American folk and genre painters include shelf, banjo and tall clocks in their domestic scenes, Marc Chagall often depicts a German wall clock from his Eastern European boyhood home, and Jamie Wyeth’s 1994 view on Monhegan Island has his teenage model Orca Bates posed next to a stately grandfather clock.

Unlike random photo snapshots, nothing in paintings, drawings, prints and fine-art photography appears by accident.  Each artist decides what is included. In many, if not most, instances where clocks and watches are present, they have symbolic or metaphorical significance. When mechanical timepieces first appeared in the 13th century, analogies to “God the clockmaker” were common, linking a clock’s steady self-propelled action to the motion of the entire universe.  During the Renaissance, timekeepers demonstrated a person’s or city’s affluence, discipline, and technological sophistication. Later artworks continued to use clocks and watches to symbolize mortality and the need for humans to use wisely their brief time on earth. More modern depictions may emphasize the growing tyranny of timekeeping that governs all our waking hours. Sometimes the timepiece simply shows the time, but usually for a specific reason.

In an educational and entertaining illustrated lecture combining art and horology histories, Bob Frishman will project images of more than 150 artworks, most by well-known artists. In some, the clock or watch is boldly apparent; in others, it is a minor but significant character that needs pointing out.  For each, Frishman will briefly discuss the artist, the context, and the timekeeper. Art lovers will enjoy this multi-century panorama of art, and horological enthusiasts will view timepieces with important roles in these period settings.

Bob Frishman, photographed by Kevin Harkins

About Bob Frishman
Bob Frishman is founder and owner of Bell-Time Clocks in Andover, Massachusetts.  He has collected, restored, researched, written and lectured about timekeepers since 1980.  He has repaired more than 7,000 clocks and watches, and sold more than 1,700. He is a Fellow of the National Association of Watch and Clock Collectors, Chairman of the NAWCC Time Symposium Committee, and a Freeman of the Worshipful Company of Clockmakers (London, UK). Along with dozens of articles on many horology topics, he writes a “Horology in Art” feature for each issue of the NAWCC magazine. 

He is organizing a “Horology in Art” NAWCC symposium in October, 2017, at the Boston Museum of Fine Arts. A roster of eminent art historians and curators already have been recruited to discuss artworks in their areas of expertise, and each will be followed by a horologist who will describe timepieces depicted in the projected artworks.

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Intertwining Roots - Watchmaking, Artisanship & Technology, by Michael Friedman
Dec
12
6:00 PM18:00

Intertwining Roots - Watchmaking, Artisanship & Technology, by Michael Friedman

  • HSNY at the General Society Library (map)
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Michael Friedman - Historian for Audemars Piguet

While most objects and technologies that we engage with on a daily basis will be upgraded in a matter of a couple years or less, expertly crafted mechanical watches are designed and constructed to last "forever." Mechanical watches are among a tiny category of objects of permanence that stand in defiance of the planned obsolescence that defines the vast majority of contemporary consumerism. This special place that watches holds in the present day is directly connected to the fact that watchmaking is among the most interdisciplinary fields in existence, deeply rooted in various spheres within both the arts and sciences. 

Friedman will explore how watchmaking's intertwined relationship with art and technology has been central to its evolution during the past 500 years. By examining key moments during the 1500s, the mid 1600s, the early 1800s, the Industrial Revolution, the mid 20th century, the Quartz Era and the Present Day, Friedman will shed light as to why mechanical watches continue to galvanize collectors and enthusiasts worldwide and why we are in a golden age of highly creative and innovative watchmaking. 

About Michael Friedman
Michael L. Friedman is an established horological expert, appraiser, curator, lecturer, auctioneer and producer. He is the Historian at Audemars Piguet. Michael's extensive career in watches and clocks began in 1996 at Willard House & Clock Museum where he served as assistant curator. In 1997, he joined The National Watch & Clock Museum as Curator where he co-developed 15,000 square feet of exhibition space devoted to the history of time measurement - from sundials to the atomic clock. In 1999, Michael was named VP & Department Head of Watches for Christie's in New York. In 2003 he founded MLF Horology which provided consultant and curator services for international collectors, institutions and auction houses.

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Theories of Time, by Dr. Demetrios Matsakis
Nov
14
6:00 PM18:00

Theories of Time, by Dr. Demetrios Matsakis

  • HSNY at the General Society Library (map)
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Dr. Demetrios Matsakis - Chief Scientist for Time Services, U.S. Naval Observatory

Philosophers have speculated on the nature of time for millennia. Einstein brought the question to a new level, but today many scientists and philosophers think they have an even deeper understanding. Unfortunately they don't always agree with each other.  At the November meeting of the Horological Society of New York, Dr. Demetrios Matsakis will give an equationless review of some of these theories, and let you decide what to believe.

About Dr. Demetrios Matsakis
Dr. Demetrios Matsakis is a physicist who went to MIT and U.C. Berkeley, where he studied under the Nobel-prize winning professor who invented the laser, and constructed two special-purpose lasers to study the molecular clouds where stars are born. After graduating he used radio astronomy to measure the wobbles in the Earth’s rotation, by looking at quasars near the edge of the observable universe. Later he became interested in timekeeping with atomic clocks and rapidly spinning neutron stars (pulsars). He went on to manage the Time Service Department of the US Naval Observatory, which uses over 100 atomic clocks to set the time for GPS and much of the world. Under his management, a set of four atomic fountains were designed and built, measuring time to 16 decimal places. This is currently the most precise 24x7 measurement system ever built by mankind to measure anything. He is a past president of the International Astronomical Union’s Time Commission, has served on many international commissions related to the timekeeping art, represented the U.S. in Geneva, and published over 100 papers along with one short story that is admittedly pure science fiction.

Dr. Demetrios Matsakis

Video courtesy The Atlantic.

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The History of the Calendar, by François-Paul Journe
Oct
24
6:00 PM18:00

The History of the Calendar, by François-Paul Journe

  • HSNY at the General Society Library (map)
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Hosted by François-Paul Journe, Founder, Montres F.P. Journe, Switzerland

Hidden below the dial, the calendar complication holds centuries worth of fascinating technical development. From simple to perpetual calendars, that development has never stopped. Today, the complication represents a desire to master the specificities of the multiple calendar systems in use worldwide. At the October meeting of the Horological Society of New York, François-Paul Journe will host a discussion on the history of calendars with a panel of world-class experts.

Mr. Journe will be joined by Pierre Halimi Lacharlotte, General Manager of Montres Journe America, Jack Forster, Editor in Chief of HODINKEE, Noel Poirier, Director of the National Watch & Clock Museum and Keith Lehman, Editor of NAWCC's WatchNews. A display of important calendar pocket watches from Mr. Journe’s personal collection and from the National Watch & Clock Museum will be on display, as well as the new F.P. Journe Quantième Perpétuel with instantaneous jump.

 François-Paul Journe

François-Paul Journe

About François-Paul Journe
In the exclusive world of haute horology, François-Paul Journe has explored the measurement of time for over 33 years with a unique sense of creativity and innovation. As an independent contemporary master watchmaker, he draws on his historical knowledge and expertise to face the most daring horological challenges, conceiving entirely new calibres with a timeless consistency.
 
At the crossroad between Arts and Haute Horology, the independent F.P. Journe Manufacture produces its movements in 18K rose Gold, a first in the watch world and unique signature of the brand.  In the respect of the haute horology tradition, Francois-Paul Journe labeled his watches with ­Invenit et Fecit- (invented and made), guaranteeing an exclusive in-house calibre, entirely invented, constructed, and assembled in the Geneva workshops. F.P. Journe produces no more than 900 precision watches per year.  These innovative unparalleled mechanisms such as the Chronomètre à Résonance, the Sonnerie Souveraine or the Tourbillon Souverain have earned F.P. Journe the world’s most prestigious horological awards.

About Pierre Halimi Lacharlotte
After completing his studies at ESCP (Ecole Supérieure de Commerce de Paris), Mr. Halimi-Lacharlotte established a company in Miami for the distribution of Swiss watches in the USA. 

In 1987 at Baselworld, he met François-Paul Journe, an independent watchmaker with a thoroughly different approach who draws on his historical knowledge to create innovative precision chronometers.  This changed his vision of the watch industry in favor of independent horology with a genuine authenticity, offering manufacture calibres and he discovers the exclusive world of haute horology.
 
In 2009, Mr. Halimi-Lacharlotte became F.P. Journe’s partner in the company in charge of the Americas.  After introducing independent haute horology to the American consumer, he has developed the American market into a success with four F.P. Journe Boutiques,  six Espaces, and a network of top qualified retailers. 

About Jack Forster
Jack Forster is Editor in Chief of HODINKEE. He first became interested in watches as a student in graduate school, and spent many years collecting and repairing vintage pocket watches as a hobby. From 2006 to 2015 he was a part of Revolution Press Ltd, first as Group Technical Editor, and then as Editor in Chief for the US edition of Revolution Magazine. He is the author of Cartier: Time Art, a catalogue for the exhibition of the same name, which chronicles the history of watch and clockmaking at Cartier from its inception to the present day.

About Noel Poirier
Noel Poirier is the Museum Director for the National Watch & Clock Museum, operated by the National Association of Watch & Clock Collectors. Mr. Poirier has been with the Museum for ten years, overseeing the Museum’s achievement of accreditation by the American Alliance of Museums. He serves on the Board of Advisors of Wristwatch Magazine and is a member of the National Association of Watch & Clock Collectors, the Horological Society of New York, and the Early American Industries Association.

About Keith Lehman
Keith Lehman is the Editor of NAWCC's WatchNews. Hired by the National Association of Watch & Clock Collectors in 2015, Lehman had been a freelance artist for the National Watch and Clock Museum since 2011. He worked for the Tibetan Aid Project and at the Odiyan Retreat Center in California where he helped with bronze casting for the Cintamani Temple and designed Western-style Tibetan prayer books for the World Peace Ceremony in Bodh Gaya, India.

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The History of Chronographs, From the Beginning Until 1980, by Sébastien Chaulmontet
Sep
12
6:00 PM18:00

The History of Chronographs, From the Beginning Until 1980, by Sébastien Chaulmontet

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Dr. Sébastien Chaulmontet – Head of Movement Design for Manufacture La Joux-Perret, Arnold & Son and Angelus Watches, Switzerland

Doors open at 6:30pm for coffee & conversation. Lecture begins promptly at 7:00pm.

The technical development of the chronograph is a fascinating story, and there may be no one more qualified to tell it than Dr. Sébastien Chaulmontet, Head of Movement Design for Manufacture La Joux-Perret, Arnold & Son and Angelus Watches. At the September meeting of the Horological Society of New York, Dr. Chaulmontet will lecture on the history of the chronograph, beginning with its predecessors, to the creation of the so-called modern (pocket) chronograph.

Moving towards present day, the industrialization of the complication will be discussed, along with an overview of American pocket chronographs. The three major ébauche (blank) producers will be highlighted along with the chronograph makers using in-house movements like Angelus, Excelsior Park, Lemania, Longines, Minerva, Movado and Universal. Famous models from important brands as Breitling, Enicar, Heuer, Omega, Patek Philippe, Rolex or Zenith shall of course not be missed. Finally, some interesting aspects of collecting antique and vintage chronographs will be presented.

About Sébastien Chaulmontet
Sébastien Chaulmontet is the author, with Dr Joël Pynson, of the book "Chronographs for Collectors." He is also an expert collector of antique and vintage chronographs. Doctor of law and lawyer by training, he is today a watch movement creator and head of innovation at Manufacture La Joux-Perret, Arnold & Son and Angelus.

Photographs by Joël Pynson

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A Story of Old Horology in London, by Seth Kennedy
Jul
5
6:00 PM18:00

A Story of Old Horology in London, by Seth Kennedy

Seth Kennedy – Antiquarian Horologist, London
Doors open at 6:00pm for coffee & conversation. Lecture begins promptly at 7:00pm.

London has a deep horological history, stretching back for hundreds of years. How did the horological industry fit in throughout London’s intense urban development? What is it like to work on antique timepieces today in modern London? Antiquarian Horologist Seth Kennedy will discuss these questions and more at the July meeting of the Horological Society of New York. In addition, Kennedy will present a detailed look at 18th and 19th century watches that he has restored, including the making of pocket watch cases from scratch.

About Seth Kennedy
Kennedy came to antiquarian horology after a career as a mechanical engineer. In his earlier years of horological work Kennedy underwent informal training from a highly accomplished watchmaker and has since developed his own specialized tools and techniques. His focus is on the repair and restoration of pocket watches, dating from 17th century to the early 20th century.

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Dynamic Poising: A Conversation With Gravity, by John Teifert
Jun
13
6:00 PM18:00

Dynamic Poising: A Conversation With Gravity, by John Teifert

John Teifert - Manager, Technical Workshop, Swatch Group U.S.
Doors open at 6:00pm for coffee & conversation. Lecture begins promptly at 7:00pm.

Please note that this meeting is on June 13, rather than our usual first Monday of the month.

Dynamic poising is an important skill that allows watchmakers to minimize positional errors. The operation today is fairly straightforward as long as you understand the theory of why you're making the adjustment. The history of dynamic poising helps us appreciate the value of a well adjusted movement and the difficulty involved in making dynamic adjustments. Often poorly understood, we will discuss the history, theory, and practice of proper dynamic poising.

About John Teifert
John Teifert is a lifelong watch collector, a WOSTEP certified watchmaker and graduate of the OSU-Okmulgee School of Watchmaking. After graduation he earned ten years experience at the bench and eventually completed tourbillon training at Breguet. He currently manages Swatch Group's watchmaking workshop in Secaucus, NJ.

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Investing in Watchmaking for the 21st Century, by William Massena
May
2
6:00 PM18:00

Investing in Watchmaking for the 21st Century, by William Massena

William Massena - Managing Director of TimeZone.com

Doors open at 6:00pm for coffee & conversation. Lecture begins promptly at 7:00pm.

 Rolex "Paul Newman" Daytona

Rolex "Paul Newman" Daytona

This illustrated talk will explore the promise versus the reality of watches as an alternative asset class. Can watches be an effective investment or is this merely a marketing myth? The talk will look at notable auction results as case studies, consider how marketing affects the horology industry today and what challenges this poses to the watchmakers of tomorrow.

About William Massena

William Massena is the Managing Director of TimeZone.com, the world’s largest online watch discussion forum, to which he has been a key contributor since its founding in 1995. He is also a partner at Digital Luxury Group, a Geneva-based marketing and communication research company for luxury brands. Previously, he was the Chief Operating Officer and Managing Director of Antiquorum S.A., the leading horological auction house.

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John Harrison: Longitude, the Precision Watch and Pendulum Clock, by Rory McEvoy
Apr
4
6:00 PM18:00

John Harrison: Longitude, the Precision Watch and Pendulum Clock, by Rory McEvoy

Rory McEvoy - Curator of Horology at the Royal Observatory, Greenwich, UK

This illustrated talk will take a look at the extraordinary story of John Harrison and his work in developing navigational clocks and watches for use at sea. It will explore his journey and unlikely beginnings, look at influences evident in his work found in the mechanical ‘DNA’ of his sea clocks and highlight some of the aspects of his work that are significant to the modern world.

 Rory McEvoy

Rory McEvoy

About Rory McEvoy
Trained in conservation and restoration of antique clocks at West Dean College, Chichester in 1998-9 and subsequently worked at the bench, specialized in conservative restoration of ‘Golden Age’ English clocks. After a three-year stint as clock specialist for Bonhams Auctioneers, joined the National Maritime Museum as Curator of Horology at the Royal Observatory. Research interests include: the development and application of precision watches and clocks, the life and work of George Graham FRS and the more modern history of time standardization and distribution.  

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HSNY 150th Anniversary Gala
Mar
29
6:00 PM18:00

HSNY 150th Anniversary Gala

  • HSNY at the General Society Library (map)
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In March of 1866, a group of New York City watchmakers formed a society to further their interests both scientifically and socially. 150 years later we are continuing our founders' mission to Advance the Art and Science of Horology. Join us as we celebrate our past and look forward to a bright future!

Speakers

Proclamations & Awards

  • Mayoral proclamation honoring HSNY from the City of New York
  • Proclamation from the German government
  • Presentation of the The Howard Fass award

Food, Drink & Entertainment

Enjoy a large selection of appetizers, entrees and desserts, with an open bar from 6:00pm - 9:00pm. Live music by the Diamond Chips, honoring our Society's German heritage.

All attendees will receive a free copy of the limited edition HSNY 150th Year Archival Book, authored by Michael Osnato, HSNY Archivist & Historian.

Suggested attire: business formal.

All proceeds from this event go towards the Horological Society of New York's ongoing educational programs. The Horological Society of New York is a registered 501(c)(3) non-profit organization, federal tax identification number 13-6139887.


HSNY thanks our sponsors for their generous support

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Watch Portraiture: Taking a Closer Look With Macro Photography, by Atom Moore
Mar
7
6:00 PM18:00

Watch Portraiture: Taking a Closer Look With Macro Photography, by Atom Moore

Atom Moore - Art Director analog/shift

Photography is a very important part of keeping people engaged with horology. Since gaining access to a wide variety of watches through the RedBar Crew, Atom Moore has focused his lens ever closer into the intricate details of these fascinating timepieces. Taking portraits of watches has become his passion. The tiny mechanical details are often hard to see or understand for those who are not watchmakers or experts in the field. To help shine a light on the complex details in mechanical watches, Atom will share some insight into his passion and methods for creating watch portraits. In presenting watches as portraits, he hopes to engage not just existing watch enthusiasts, but the general public as well.

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Our Shared Horological Heritage: The National Watch & Clock Museum, by Noel Poirier
Feb
1
6:00 PM18:00

Our Shared Horological Heritage: The National Watch & Clock Museum, by Noel Poirier

  • HSNY at the General Society Library (map)
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Please note: This meeting is at our new meeting and lecture venue, the General Society Library at 20 W 44th St. (between 5th & 6th Ave) in Midtown Manhattan. Doors open at 6:00pm, the lecture begins at 7:00pm.

Noel Poirier, Museum Director

Discover the stories and methods used by the National Watch & Clock Museum to engage the general public in the history, arts, science and technology of our shared horological experience. Housing the largest and most comprehensive public collection of timepieces in North America, the National Watch & Clock Museum may soon stand alone as the only cultural institution actively preserving and presenting this important and meaningful aspect of human existence in the US. What are the challenges faced in presenting this story? How will the Museum continue to grow and develop in the future to ensure the story continues to be presented? Why is this story so important to our modern society? Mr. Poirier will provide background on the Museum, share its collection and its future in this candid and open discussion.

Visit the National Watch & Clock Museum's Youtube page.

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